Friday, May 7, 2010

Mediocrity Prevails in the 2010 British Election


The 2010 British Election resulted in a hung parliament with no party with an outright majority. This result is consistent with the FDA's 2010 British election study which graded/ranked the three main candidates/parties as mediocre in terms of their ability to represent the British people. The FDA concluded that none of the British parties were worthy of a majority government.

The possibility of a coalition government made up of the Conservatives and Liberal Democrats would be a check on one party control.

Actual 2010 British Election results:

1. Conservative (Cameron) seats 306 
2. Labour (Brown) seats 258
3. Liberal Democrats (Clegg) seats 57

*326 seats needed to win a majority.

The FDA's British Election study results:

1. Nick Clegg (Liberal Democrat) (67.8% grade—C+ grade)
2. David Cameron (Conservative) (65.8% grade—C+ grade)
3. Gordon Brown (Labour) (63.4% grade—C grade)

C+ grade refers to a slightly more than satisfactory candidate in terms of representing the relevant population group. The candidate does not stand out as a political representative. He or she is mediocre.

C grade refers to a satisfactory candidate in terms of representing the relevant population group. The candidate does not stand out as a political representative. He or she is mediocre.

Though Nick Clegg and the Liberal Democrats did not fair well, their poor showing can be attributed to the fact that there is little to choose from between the candidates/parties. Also, the British system is based on first-past-the-post, and therefore it does not reflect the percentage of votes each candidate/party received. For example, the Liberal Democrats received 23% of the overall British vote and Labour received 29%, and yet Labour won 201 more seats than the Liberal Democrats. Clearly, the British electoral system result is not reflective of the British people's will, in terms of percentage of seats won.
 
Moreover, only 65.1% of the eligible British voters voted, which means 34.9% did not vote. In the context of the results, the Conservatives barely received a higher percentage votes (36.1%) than those voters who did not vote. (1.2% difference)
 
2010 British Election results

FDA 2010 British Election Evaluation Report

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